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for anything. so that's the ultimate heavy surf club. frankly from a u.s. standpoint, much of what they want to do is not just wasteful, but wickedness. there's an awful other things the u.n. general assembly would like to see go forward that are really quite bad and they are quite willing to cover for the worst lenders survey human race standpoint, for many standpoints in this way. the nature of such a body insisted it organs that depend within the institutions tend to be the worse you are, the more you have an incentive that might somehow say things about you. they have the worst act varies because it protects them and create a racket for them and their friends. >> host: in your book, "living with the un," the u.s. should seek a buyer and containment of the human investment. postscript the general assembly and appendages by and large are hostile to the united states, wasteful, will basically seek any resources can attempt to use them. but there are numbers to particular institutions of the u.n., a quasi-independent body was branded it the u.n. they generally speaking have a chance which re
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
and this tradition is in the u.s. law that was found just about everywhere. one of the reasons that is true is other nations do not have the statutory damages because in case you make a mistake they go far beyond the cost so, in other places there isn't much of a financial motivation to relieve the laughter people unless they were actually stealing but it's interesting the places that haven't had very use as something they want to adopt and it's probably the most vivid example because they believe they are stopping innovation unless they loosen up the ability of access of the existing culture and the prime minister had been saying exactly this the british innovation may be at stake because they don't have fair use and he would like to be able to have that protection to be let the copyright law, of something called fair dealing which is a list of exemptions of specific things you can do rather than make up your own mind that it should be transformative inappropriate they rerouted so it was long of an invitation to make the decision by itself again for the reason they believed it is associated with in
into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject. so that is why the format is kind of like an illustrated picture book. as i started looking into there are families that are involved in the policy to eradicate coca, as well as family and social economic issues. the history of coca, especially with the relationships of cocaine and the coca-cola company, and the drug problem that we have today. it got really complicated. it is now a book
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
on book tv computer andres talks about a long history of smuggling in the u.s., which prior to the revolutionary war was driven by a desire to grow domestic industries and bypass paying import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies. the discussion of peter and raises new book, smuggler nation, hal illicit trade made america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up
came to the u.s. in the u.s. to us recall that the other side and as a child i also thought [speaking in spanish] was the other side of the map. so i thought that's where the u.s. west, on the other side of this nonsense. >> host: when did you come to the u.s. and why? >> guest: i came to the u.s. when i was nine and a half years old back in 1985 and the reason why i.t. was because my parents were already here. my father left when i was too, my mother came anonymous one and a half and my father came back to mexico. he thought we weren't taking care of by the relatives we are left with and decided to release her because he changed his mind about coming back to mexico and decided we should join him here in the u.s. >> host: how did you get to the other side? >> guest: i had to run a lot. we had to cross the border illegally through tijuana. also the first two times we got caught by border patrol, my father was hesitant to bring me at first because i was nine and half of the time many thought it was too little for the journey. we did get caught the first two times i felt immensely guilty
of research for students everywhere not only the u.s. but also in south asia. and i just actually returned from pakistan for 48 hours ago. i was just joking with a friend that my three days in pakistan ab about two and a half days was spent on discussing the new phenomena a religious -- [inaudible] it's become recent and new follow that that. many political leaders holding big rallies with hundreds of thousands of people coming up with the coming up with new slogans and now with the elections coming in three months or so. there's a lot of political activity. i'm focusing about seven minutes i'm given on not the -- [inaudible] and i want to add to my position in the government opposition that seeing today in my views of my perm views and not representative of dod. the landscape in what was called the -- [inaudible] that's what i focused on. this is the [inaudible] we often focus on the unsettled area which is federally. we often look at adjoining which the british had framed like this. which is about 25 million people perhaps but more than all of them together in afghanistan. so this is ver
criticized -- >> that's because they included u.s. citizens. [inaudible] excluded u.s. citizens when -- >> that's got to be their opening salvo. >> i don't think the admiral's going to want to tell the judges they handle it that way. >> [inaudible] >> that's a waste of time. look, we have very little facts in the case. they're so sensitive that we don't even get them -- [inaudible] my responsibility. >> who made you first chair? >> the admiral mentioned my name. >> so? >> all right. i'll tell you what, we'll flip for it. >> okay. >> call it. >> heads. yeah, but -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> well, that, that's one of many, many dramatic representations of the military commission's project at guantanamo, and one thing that we learn from it is that the people involved are extraordinarily good looking. [laughter] it's actually from the television show "jag" which no longer is on the air, but it would take its storylines from cases, mainly military cases that took place, and that episode, called "tribunal," actually aired in april of 2002. so president bush issued an order a
in the u.s. capitol, and like all tourists, the very first thing i did when i came to washington, d.c. was to take a tour of the national mall. but when i got there i noticed something. if you just came to washington, d.c., and just went to the national, you almost believe african-americans never lived in the city. i went from one end of the mall to the other from the capitol all the way down to the lincoln memorial looking for the african-american history of washington, d.c.. and i could barely find anything. i said to myself that can't be true. i know there's african-american history in the city. it has to be african-american history of the national mall. maybe no one has bothered to sit and find out what it is and that's how this book came about. starting in the u.s. capitol, i needed my goal to find out what the african-american history of the national mall and this book is the result. i'm going to take a few minutes here today to talk about some of the things i discovered not only about the national mall, but about washington, d.c. as a city. some things i open interest you and
>> at now, peter andreas talks about the long history of smuggling in the u.s. from which prior to the revolutionary war, was stricken by a desire to curb domestic indices and bypass import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> at afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies for the discussion a peter andreas' new book, "smuggler: how illicit trade made america." housekeeping i have to mention some things. the way we are going to run assist fathers. to do with brief introduction and then peter will talk about the book because obviously we need to say something a context than most of you have not read the book would be a one-way conversation. i will invite catherine richard and james to say their piece on the boat and hopefully we can get stuck in a good position. after that we will open up for q&a. you will see one fixed microphone there and another vocal microphone for the site of the house. if you wish to join q&a, get up and stand behind the microphone. we have to do it this way because they are so mobile is for recording c-span a
officials about oil, iraq, iran, arab-israeli, u.s.-saudi, so geopolitical issues. and when i retired from the journal in 2006, the one thing i was really interested in doing with my newfound time was trying to understand saudi society. how did saudis look at each other, what was the society like, how do they look at the rulers. how do they look at us? and as i speak about saudi arabia, everyone constantly asks me, why did you do that? why did you spend five years month after month going there? dressed in my long black -- my editor asked me that actually when i turned in the manuscript. she said, you know, why did you do this? and i said, because it's interesting that and she said, harris is interesting. interesting. [laughter] so why did you do this? you know, make me understand. that was her only editing going on the book. so i will try to make you understand why i found it both fascinating and important. saudi arabia is probably the strangest country you will never see. it is so different from our own. a woman and there never reaches the age of maturity. she is always under the control
private censorship does not have it. this those exemptions are all different. the u.s. fair use law is the one that is most flexible and most adaptable to new circumstances and in the way most abstract. it basically says the descent into an different and you're only taking as much as is appropriate, go ahead and make new cultures. practice what happens in many commercial businesses, including publishing an international film coproduction and distribution is if it is in the u.s. outcome is usually just about everywhere. one of the reasons that's true with other nations do not have statutory damages for which her great big fines and casey made a mistake it goes far beyond the cost. so in other places, there just isn't much of a financial motivation to really go after people unless they're actually stealing. go at us as interesting as places that have not had fair use are increasingly looking at fair use system and they want to adopt. the united kingdom is probably the latest and most vivid example because they believe they are stopping innovation unless they loosen not their ability t
. unfortunately, it's impossible to carry out that size experiment in the u.s., but there are thousands of traditional societies in which children already did grow up with even much more freedom are much less freedom than in the modern u.s. by examining what actually does or did happen in traditional societies that are much more varied than modern american society, we need able to learn things of practical value to us in deciding how to raise our kids, how to treat our older people, how to remain healthy and other things that we care a lot about. tribal society should be scorned as primitive and ms. well, but also they shouldn't be idealized as happy and peaceful. when we learn of travel practices, some of them will horrify us but their other tribal factors of which when we hear about them, we may admire and envy them and wonder whether we could adopt those practices ourselves. to get some perspective on how we treat elderly people in western modern societies, let me tell you the opinion of a friend of mine from the fiji islands in the pacific who had this idea of the united states. it
surprised that they had behavior at 16. it keeps corrections from happening. in addition, the only way the u.s. government can manage the deficit is because the federal reserve's ability to print on it. today the federal reserve couldn't print money. i don't think the u.s. -- he would not be creditworthy if you couldn't print money and that creates a huge temptation for politicians. i'm not the label discipline physical policy until he do with monetary policy. you have very specific areas to lead to the financial crisis. in the late 1990s, alan greenspan is head of the federal reserve, wanted to be a hero in us getting ready to retire and we had a minor correction. so greenspan wants to go on a good note city starts lowering interest rates, the effective printing money and he creates negative real interest rates. you can borrow turn on to criticize in the appreciation rate on housing, which invented a huge investment in housing and then right at the end of his term, greenspan realizes he's screwed up and he and his successors start raising interest rates rapidly and create something called an
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
and statistics. is really true when you are looking at farm numbers and statistics. that is the case with the u.s. department of agriculture statistics. the problem with this analysis on subsidies is the statistics that are used by usda assert that we have 2.2 million farmers. the agency is probably very embarrassed about the lousy job they have been doing because they are lying with those statistics. a close look at the numbers shows that usda numbers count the one third of two.2 million entities that have failed under $1,000 and two thirds of those entities have failed under $10,000. those are not profits, those are sales. those are the small businesses down the road from my family farm. i don't run, my husband runs. i have a neighbor who may sell $10,000 of grapes a year to a winemaker down the road. i am not sure if he sells that many and i have a friend who has come close and has a flower business during the summer. i know she makes under $1,000 in the summer growing flowers for a local restaurant. she does it because she enjoys it. these are not farmers, these are not people who consider th
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
out that societal experiment in the u.s. but, there are thousands of traditional societies in which children already did grow up with either much more or much less freedom than in the modern u.s. by examining what actually does or did happen in traditional societies that are much more varied than modern american society, we may be able to learn things of practical value to our -- to decide how to raise our kids to achieve our older people, remain healthy and other things that we care a lot about. tribal society should not be scorned as primitive, miserable, but they should also nobile di -- the idealized as happy and peaceful. when we learn of travel practices, some of the more horrifying, but there were other tribal factions which one we hear about them, we may admire and envy them and wonder whether we can adopt those practices ourselves. to get some perspective on how we treat elderly people in western, modern society, let me tell you the opinion of a friend of mine from the seat -- islands in the pacific to have visited the united states. there were some things my friends admire
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
, u.s., geopo litical issues. when i return all -- retired from the "journal" one thing i was interested in doing with my new found time was trying to understand saudi society. what did the society looks like? how did they look at their rulers, us? as i speak about saudi arabia people constantly ask me why did you do that? why did you spend five years going bear dressed -- they're dressed in black. my editors said why did you do this? i said because of interest be. she said paris is interesting. [laughter] why did you do this? may meander stand that was her own the editing point*. so i will try to make you understand why i found it both fascinating and important. saudi arabia is probably the strangest country will never see. it is so different from our own. a woman never reaches the age of maturity, she is always under the control of some man. she cannot go to her son's school she cannot see her son graduate. she obviously doesn't drive drive, we know that and does not appear in public without being covered and with the worst situations, it just chattel for a man to do as
, and persistence" in an interview in maryland, arrest o'connell talked to the history of the u.s. marine corps. it's about fifteen minutes. as part of the university series we like to visit campuses across the country and talk with professors who are authors. this week we're at the u.s. navel academy in maryland. joining us is aaron oh connell who is also the authority of this book "underdog: the making of the modern ma marine corps.." what was it established? >>1775. but the birthday is something of a myth. the marines claim 10, november, 1775. that's actually just the date that congress authorized the creation of the marine corps. .. it's a very small part of the navy. the burning cars completely separate from the navy now. >> they are completely her. this became contentious throughout the course history. they would claim they should follow the rules of the navy. when they shared the regulation of the army and eventually in 1832 they became a separate service inside. >> host: had their mission change? guests at the mission to change so much. there midship urged into the 20 century, but there wer
. now, where has the u.s. supreme court been on all of this? where has the u.s. supreme court been? well, far from protecting the interests of discreet and insular minorities, far from doing that, the u.s. supreme court has been busy defending this war at every turn. the u.s. supreme court or over the last couple decades has eviscerated amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures granting to the police the authority to stop, frisk, search just about anyone anywhere without any probable cause or reasonable suspicion, not a shred of evidence of criminal activity as long as they get consent. now, what's consent? consent is when a police officer walks up to a young man, officer walks up to the young man with one hand on his gun and says, son, put your arms up in the air so i can search you, see if you've got anything on you. kid says, uh-huh. that young man just waived his fourth amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures. law enforcement doesn't have to have a shred of evidence to support that frisk now that the young man has consented, of course, belie
. arrested that we do via video so it works wonderfully. >> host: have you kept your u.s. citizenship? >> guest: oh yes. >> host: why? >> guest: my mother and father and my grandparents survived that for me. it is my duty. >> host: in "quitting america" the departure of a black man from his native land written in 2004 and by the way have you changed any of your views since the election of barack obama? >> guest: i remember my mother when he was nominated, hazel and khalia and i were in montrÉal. she called me at the hotel. she was i think 93 then. she said, and she was crying. [inaudible] i didn't need that telling. i always knew this. america is many places. it is a place that can be tolerant and accepting, a place where views can be moderated and differences can be reconciled. and i think a good deal of america supported vigorously the candidacy of a rock obama. and it's not only important to the black community. it's important to other americans as well. but he still faces a sort of vicious kind of ridicule from certain borders that are not unlike the america we saw when i was you
. in addition, deal than the u.s. government cannot massive deficits is because the federal reserve's ability to play funny. today the federal reserve couldn't print money. no time at interest rates with me. i don't think the u.s. could -- and would not be creditworthy if you couldn't print money. that creates a huge temptation for politicians. republicans and democrats. i don't think whether disciplined fiscal policy until monetary policy. the recent financial crisis. in the late 1990s, early 2000, alan greenspan had been there long time, wanted to be a hero. he was getting ready to retire for having the minor correction. greenspan was going to be good note, so he starts lowering interest rates, the effect to printing money. it creates negative real interest rate. so you can borrow dramatically less than the appreciation rate of housing, which incentive a huge investment house in which a prayer at such low interest rates. in right at the end of his term, greenspan realizes he's screwed up and he and his successors to raising interest rates very rapidly and create something: inverted joker. a
, and then after the united states fought a war with mexico, we became a u.s. territory, and the santa fe trail opened, bringing in americans, or the first quote-unquote white men into this part of the world. and the impressions of the early traders and settlers who came across the santa fe trail are an important part of our literature because they recorded their experiences and their impressions of santa fe, and many of them could not believe that a royal city had houses made of mud. there was a little bit of culture shock. others took to the exotic feel of the place and the beautiful mountain setting. that's true today. ensanta fe inspired strong emotions. for example, an, a czech tyler historian at the university of new mexico wrote a book called, the myth of santa fe, in which she documents the evolution of santa fe and why the city fathers decided we needed to change the santa fe look to an earlier time in order to attract tourism, and why it's not necessarily an advantage for santa fe's culture, and certainly not to events authentic indigenous architecture. a famous novel was written that
and the continuing struggle for freedom in america." mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission begin to decline? >> guest: the civil rights commission started in 1957. president president eisenhower had a lot those discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, how the united states was world that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lunching or some kind of discrimination taking place in the country. so the idea was, as eisenhower said he slammed the table is inside those are the facts. the commission has been out, there is a tough problem that people don't want to do anything about it. so they get a report on it goes away. but this commission is supposed to put the facts on top of the table and then its future would depend on what i found out, how aggressive it was and what the public thought about what they were doing. >> said this was initially set up as a temporary commission? just go right it came the year before the little rock crisis. but the ferment going on in the countr
posed by guerrillas. they have been around longer than civilization itself. and the fact that the u.s. army and marine corps and other modern militaries including the french have to deal with the threat today is absolutely unsurprising. but i don't mean to suggest that absolutely nothing has changed over the course of the last 5,000 years. there have, in fact, been some significant changes. the biggest one has to do with the power of public opinion and propaganda. and this was something that was demonstrated in our very own war of independence. now, when we think of the american war of independence, we tend to think of battles like lexington and concord where the yankees slithered on their bellies and shot at the redcoats from behind trees and rocks in the ways that the redcoats to be ungentlemanly and not quite cricket. now these were, no doubt, effective tactics. but in the end what's striking to me about the studying the american revolution is the extent to which it was decided not so much by what happened on the battlefield, but what actually happened in the house of parliament in
to mind and different intelligence agencies and whatnot. and this may surprise you, not all parts of the u.s. government work together seamlessly. [laughter] so here we are as a cycle and we have the things what we call blinks between the parts. and so one element would find a target by the time the information got to the people who are going to fix it usually with a predator or something and make sure they are there. time would have passed an accuracy of information. then it would be passed over to the raid force, again, you have a loss it's like the game telephone you whisper around the world andst it's unintelligible by the fifth person. we are try do this. we started and went on a campaign to fix the process. bringing in different parts of the organization. building our intelligence capacity, giving ourselves a mind set that was different before and before it was if each element did the part of the process then they could take great pride. we succeeded. we did what we were told. and we wiped that clean and said nobody is successful unless the whole process works. the definition of winnin
by these guys, the bolivian army rangers, trained by u.s. army special forces. and this is how che wound up, with his corpse being poked at by his enemies. to even che, this icon of revolutions, he could be defeated and killed. and ottawa to increase suggest that it's impossible to defeat any group of insurgents. you can do it. you just have to have the right strategy. well, the question is, what is the right strategy? there had been many different approaches but essentially they come down to either what i would call scorched earth or what is often known today as population counterinsurgency, or more popularly as parks and my spirit and there was kind of a controlled experiment that was unwittingly run by two of the great nations of europe, britain and france, in the 1950s to show which of these approaches is more successful. because britain and france were each fighting counter insurgencies in different colonies on different sides of the world. the french were fighting in algeria from 1954-1962. the british were fighting in malaya from 1948-1960. aand they adopted very different methods of
actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji which is, you know, caribbean geography, not in the caribbean. and it was sent at quite a lot of expense and quite a lot of effort. it was a very beautiful project for photographers to take pictures of these gleaming pallets of bottled water coming off these planes with the concept been that there was this incredible water crisis, incredible food crisis. the way it was often reported was haiti was on perhaps the verge of a famine following the earthquake. and there were real problems, then and you know, they're certainly needed to be a response, but this is an example of a response that was not very well thought out. it was a grenades just on behalf of the fiji water company. it was a lovely gesture, but it was sort of ridiculous because they actually do have water in haiti. it is an island, much like fiji, and what really need to be done was for the water to be purified and cleaned up and the existing system of water in system to be improved. and franklin long bef
chrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his 34-year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much. thanks for coming out. i think this is a wonderful opportunity. the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. [laughter] for anyone who is, pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs, you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily, in our intelligence community, in many ways to meet the challenge of this new enemy. and more than anyone that i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping that evolution and developing the what i call the targeting engine which is what we have, i think, adopted as our primary method of defending the country. so thank you for being here, general mcchrystal. the great to see you. >> thanks, mark. thanks for a too-kind introduction. i always thought of you as a nonfiction writer, but you're free to g
our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asy
picked out -- these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason to it comes from fiji which is coming, caribbean geography, not in the caribbean. and it was said that quite a lot of expensive by a lot of effort. it was a very beautiful project for photographers to take pictures of these gleaming pallets of bottled water coming off these planes with the concept being that there was this incredible water crisis, incredible food crisis. the way was often reported that he did was press on the verge of a family. there were real problems and you know, there certainly needed to be a response, but this is an example of response that is just not very well thought out. it was a very nice gesture on behalf of the fiji water company. it was a lovely gesture but it was sort of ridiculous because they actually do have water in haiti. it is an island, much like fiji, and what really needed to be done is how the water be purified come clean up and be distributed better. existing water in haiti to be improved. and, frankly, long be
around waiting for other people to do right to buy u.s. frederick douglass said it is nothing without a demand. go forth and demand your power at the ballot box. >> would you teachers at georgetown in a? >> i.t. jay legal history course by many cases of the supreme court and i teach constitutional and administrative law and sometimes property, sometimes local government law. >> when you approached the affairs or said the manuscript to a publisher, was the answer back from public affairs and why were they interested in the story? >> well, fortunately i already had a relationship from my first book about the book that's title to the integration why we still study to be in emigrated society. so i had a relationship with them and i sent a proposal to them i think they knew i was a fairly tenacious person, and they also found the story compelling. so thank you, public affairs. >> just a short conversation with george on professor sheryll cashin about her second book, "the agitators' daughter a memoir of four generations of an extraordinary african american family." by the way, booktv cover
's about success in an america as it really is. sonia sotomayor's is the third woman to serve on the u.s. supreme court. she was born in the bronx and raised in a public housing project. her parents moved from puerto rico to new york city during world war ii. her father became a factory worker and her mother joined the women's auxiliary corps. sonia sotomayor was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of seven and her father died when she was nine. she and her younger brother were raised by a single mother. her brother is now a doctor. sonia sotomayor graduated valedictorian of her high school class and she graduated from princeton university sue me, but he receiving the highest price for an undergraduate while attending yale law school she was editor of the "yale law journal." she could have become a highly paid lawyer but she went right into public service, becoming an assistant district attorney, serving the people of new york. she served at almost all levels of the judicial system including private legal practice as well as years on the federal bench. in 2009, president barack obama nomi
the world, to cheap cigars -- which the u.s. military tried to get away with giving him -- to arguments from his generals and to diet warnings and suggestions from his wife. these were largely ignored, especially the one that involved his eating only tomatoes. as i dug into all these materials, it became clear to me that for someone with churchill's great conversational skill and his ability to create a congenial setting, meals had an advantage over most kinds of meetings. they could be as long as he liked, and in the case of dinners, they could run into the wee hours when churchill gathered strength and others tired. his daughter, mary, reports that luncheon and dinner conversations often became so extended that meal times tended to prolong themselves far into the afternoon or evening with luncheons lasting sometimes until half past three. a typical evening, let's say, at checkers which is the prime minister's country house would begin at 8:30 with champagne in the drawing room. dinner would last from 9 to 10, 10:30, then cigars after the ladies were excused. when the men had rejoined the l
. churchill took u.s. ambassador harriman with him to show the allies were united in this important strategic decision. after a full day of meetings stalin invited churchill to the kremlin for a good buy dinner and what a dinner that was. as the two men and their interpreters serving themselves, no service in the kremlin, a full banquet, enough for 30 people, topped off with a pig's head. stalin opened his penknife, cleaned out the head, scraped out a piece of meat which he offered to churchill on the end of his knife. churchill polite refused, not able to show his discussed to his new allies but commenting later to his doctor that the food was filthy. that is a quote. no matter, church about what he wanted and stalin agreed to the strategy. let me spend a few minutes on what i mean when i say churchill at attention to detail was stunning. redesigned a table at his country home chart well, it was to be round, six feet in diameter, told his wife to order shares with arms to allow for relaxation, to ease the conversation and permit his guests to be comfortable for long periods of time. in a let
lawless. professor lawless, why do people run for office in the u.s.? >> guest: lots of reasons, but basically because they've thought about it, and it's been something percolating in the back of their mind for a very long time. so rarely does somebody wake up in the morning and decide, oh, this seems interesting. i wasn't thinking about this, but i don't like my incumbent, i'm going to throw my hat into the ring. it's the evolution of a very long, politically-engaged process. >> host: is it because they're concerned about policy? is it because of an ego issue? >> guest: it depends who you're talking about. one of the biggest kindings in the book is a -- findings in the book is a substantial gender difference. men are far more likely to think they're qualified to run for office, they're far more likely to think they would win, so to some extent there might be ego strength involved. but certainly it's about policy and the idea of entering the electoral arena is a way to make the world a better place. >> host: going back to the gender issue, why is it that men are convinced that t
cigars which the u.s. military tried to get away with giving, to arguments from generals and tea diet plans and suggestions from his wife. these were largely ignored, especially one that involves eating only tomatoes. as i dug into these materials, it became clear that for some of the churchill's great conversational skills and ability to create a congenial setting, mills had an advantage over most meetings. they could be as long as he liked them in the case of dinners could run into the wee hours for church gathers strength another's tired. his daughter mary had dinner conversations often became so extended that mealtime tended to prolong themselves into the afternoon or evening with months lasting sometimes until half past three. a cynical evening, let's say, the prime minister's country has to begin at 8:30 bush and the in the drawing room. cigars after the ladies were excused. when they rejoined the ladies 20 minutes or hats or later, a movie would be shown, even in wartime until about midnight when churchill would announce now to work in the dictated work until two or 3:00 in the
. to these guys believe what they're saying? sitting in that chamber the u.s. house of representatives, listening to a heated debate, we asked that question about our republican colleagues. we usually thought the answer was no, but if so, they were phenomenally good actors. their arguments made no sense to us. such well-known phrases as tax cuts paid for themselves. we will be welcomed as liberators. climate change is improving and government-run health care does not work. repeated over and over again. republican arguments along these lines seem incomprehensible to democrats, just as ours seemed misguided to them. the evidence that medical tests made no difference to them. free-market principles that they took as given conflicted with the information that we took every day from our constituents, and the economists that we consulted. news media preoccupation with lack of stability makes -- missed the point. i traveled of republican members of congress to the middle east and enjoy their company. we worked out together in the house gym. still, more time socializing with each other would not have clo
assassin," including his examination of the four people who have successfully assassinated u.s. presidents. it's about 40 minutes. >> so a couple, let me count it, one, two, three, four, five -- fourteen days ago in new york city we broke the guinness world record. we were trying to break the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdest thing you can do with your -- nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we broke the record, it was great. nothing was nerdier except being in a bookstore on a friday night, people, okay? [laughter] so just, i pity all of us really, all of us. um, i want to say the most important thing of all. it will be, i promise, the most important thing i will say tonight, and that is thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downhill, and i'll tell you, i'll save some of the specific thank yous for the end. what we're here to talk about is "the fifth assassin," and people always say where do you get your ideas for books? i'll tell you about this store. because of dakota, no one gets crazier mail than me.
states serving life sentences for first-time truck offenses -- drug offenses. life sentences. the u.s. supreme court upheld life sentences for first-time drug offenders against an eighth amendment challenge that such sentences were cruel and unusual in violation of the eighth amendment, and the u.s. supreme court said, no, no, it's not cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a young man to life in imprisonment for a first-time drug offense even though virtually no other country in the world because such a thing. so we've got to end this idea that the criminals are them, not us. and instead say there but for the grace of god go i. all of us have made mistakes in our lives, taken wrong turns. but only some of us have been required to pay for those mistakes for the rest of our lives. in fact, president barack obama himself has admitted to more than a little bit of drug use in his lifetime. he's admitted to using marijuana and cocaine in his youth. and if he hadn't been raised by white grand parents in hawaii, if he hadn't done much of his illegal drug use on predominantly white college
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
the u.s. government can run its massive deficit is because the federal us have the -- the fedee has the ability to create money and that creates a huge temptation for politicians. with republicans and democrats. i don't believe we can deal with physical policy until we deal with monetary policy. in the early two thousands, the federal reserve had been here a long time. he's getting ready to retire, he wants to go out on a good note. interest rates are starting to be lowered and it creates negative interest rates. you can borrow at less than the inflation rate. right at the end of the term, greenspan realizes that he screwed up and the interest rates create an inverted yield curve. that's a natural and on and on. what it is means that short-term rates are higher than long-term rates. if you're going to make an investment, it is riskier. only the federal reserve can do that. banks make money and created and voted yield curves. the banking business is quirky. which means you can get higher interest rates and a backbone. so they went under this negative inverted interest rate. one reaso
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